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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1942leba 








Pleased t' meet cha! 



VISION 

OF 

COLLEGE 




Charlie's getting off to a good start! 



Page 2 



ARRIVAL 

AT 
COLLEGE 




'That ain't the way I heerd it!" 



Page 3 



Go wesl, young man! 




"Where do I go from here-'" 



Before class, Charlie! Don't let it 
happen again. 




Some days you caril earn a penny — or recite 



Page 5 




"TkR. LYNCH, gentleman and 
scholar, coordinator of the col- 
lege scene, public representative of 
our organization, capable director, 
intellectual press agent, pubhc 
speaker of enviable ability and repu- 
tation, psychologist, theologist, sym- 
pathetic friend and adviser, affable 
host, admirable leader and guide — 
our president. 



PRESIDENT CLYDE A. LYNCH 





Carejul, don't bash any hash on your 
knees, Charlie! 

Page 6 





Miss Mary E. Gillespie 
Dean of Girls 




IVTISS GILLESPIE is supervisor of the Con- 
servatory. She is directing it so well and so 
efficiently that it is becoming known as "Little 
Columbia." Besides her duties as supervisor and 
teacher in the Conservatory, she is social dean of 
women and hostess of North Hall. With all this 
she still has time for the In and About Harrisburg 
Music Club, a trip to the opera in New York 
every week-end in season, and various other 
activities. 



Trouble already, Charlie? 




PkR. STONECIPHER, scholastic and govern- 
mental adviser of the student body, is a 
recognized personality and accepted authority in 
the campus background and respected guide in 
the classroom foreground. Dignity, kindliness, 
sympathy, quiet speech, and pince-nez on fore- 
finger characterize him in the undergraduate mind. 



A. H. M. Stonecipher 
Dean of Boys 



Page 7 




FACULTY 



Dr. L. G. Bailey - Super gardens by liypnotist. 



Edward M. Balsbaugh - From practice teacliiiig to 
practice golfing. 



Dr. Andrew Bender - Cliemistry is applicable in al 
fields - even decorating homes. 



Mrs. Buth Engle Bender - Since tiie ASCAP the 
collection of jazzed classical records has been 
simplified. 



Dr. Amos Black - Scientifical golf from the mathemat- 
ical view - "four." 



Dr. B. B. Butterwick - He has settled down to long 
walks. 



P. Porter Campbell - Some people make a vocation 
out of a hobby - playing the organ. 



Dr. Clark Carmean - Former Dean of the men's 
dorm recently turned farmer now has a playground 
for his dogs. 



Alexander Crawford - A lover of dogs and trainer 
of higher animals. 



Dr. Samuel H. Derickson - Seen frequently sun- 
bathing at Gretna but more frequently collecting 
lab material. 

Page 8 



FACULTY 



Merle Freeland - "Arkansas Traveler" - home from 
concert tour. 



Jerome Frock - A Boy Scout inverted - he scouts for 
tlie athletic boys. 



Christian R. Gingrich - Fishing and story telling go 
hand in hand. 



Mrs. Mary C. Green - Is the French influence the 
secret of her chic appearance ? 



Samuel 0. Grimm - Fishing in a "physical" way. 



Esther Henderson - Taking care of "her famfly' 
requires excellent cooking. 



Dr. Lena Louise Lietzau - Collector of European 
mementoes! 



Dr. V. Earl Light - Farmer teaches school in odd 
moments and takes microscopic photographs. 



Harold Malsh - First chair violinist in the Harrisburg 
Symphony Orchestra. 



Frederic Miller - Skipper Miller would plan naval 
battles if ships came in. 



Page 9 




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FACULTY 



Nella Milleb - Her hobbies are on leave of absence. 



Ella Moyer - See the world first or just ask Miss 
Moyer. 



Helen E. Meyers - The Annville Garden Club presi- 
dent enjoys birds and collecting stamps. 



Dr. G. a. Richie - Golfing an art; Greek - a culture. 



Edward P. Rutledge - In whose scrapbook we find 
Rlondie, Dagwood and Baby Dumpling among the 
other cartoons. 



Dr. Hiram H. Shenk - From north to south to east to 
west all for information for liistorical society. 



Dr. Paul 0. Shettle - The neighbors and the piano 
get tired of Danny Boy. 



Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson - Collecting china 
her game. 



Dr. Clyde S. Stine - Extra classes in music apprecia- 
tion with one pupil in the dead of night - day stu- 
dents attest to his pinochle. 



Dr. Milton L. Stokes - A typical business man finds 
his recreation in golf. 



Page 10 



FACULTY 



Dr. George G. Struble - Color behind the footlights 
- our make-up man. 

Dr. p. a. W. Wallace - Trailing Conrad Weiser. 



Miss Margaret Wood - Weekly pilgrimage to 
Thomas a Becket (pet cat). 



Dr. William Wilt - L. V. sports booster - Students' 
counselor. 




Virginia Darnell - Athletically inclined - horseback 
riding, swimming, tennis. 



Joseph Batista - Hoping the draft won't change ivory 
ticklers to trigger pullers. 



William Ullery - Watches for a birdie on the green 
behind the camera gets others to watch it. 



Page 11 



Officers and Committees of the 
Board of Trustees 



President J. R. Engle 

Vice-President . . . E. N. Funkhouser 
Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 
Financial Secretary . . ^ . J. R. Engle 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
C. A. Lynch, Chairman 
J. R. Engle E. E. Miller 

J. H. Ness W. N. McFaul 

S. C. Enck S. H. Derickson 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
J. R. Engle, Chairman 
C. A. Lynch, Pres. F. R. Plummer, 1941 

M. H. Bachman, 1943 S. H. Derickson, Treas. 
G. C. Ludwig, 1943 H. H. Raish, 1942 
J. E. Gipple, 1941 E. N. Funkhouser, 1942 



AUDITING COMMITTEE 
H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman 



I. S. Ernst 



J. E. Oliver 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

D. E. Young, Chairman 



C. G. Stambach 



G. C. Ludwig 
A. K. Mills 




We're proud oj them too, Charlie! 



FACULTY COMMITTEE 
H. H. Raish, Chairman 
E. E. Miller J. H. Ness 

C. A. Lynch C. E. Roudabush 

RUILDING AND GROUNDS COMMITTEE 

D. E. Young, Chairman 
C. A. Lynch M. J. Miller 

M. R. Flemming H. H. Shenk 

L. W. Yardley 

LIBRARY AND APPARATUS COMMITTEE 

P. B. GiPPLE, Chairman 
J. E. Oliver F. R. Plummer 

C. A. Lynch A. H. M. Stonecipher 

FARM COMMITTEE 

J. E. Gipple, Chairman 
Albert Watson S. H. Derickson 

C. A. Lynch E. E. Miller 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 
P. A. W. Wallace, Chairman 

A. K. Mills G. A. Richie 

C. A. Lynch S. 0. Grimm 

Mrs. Louisa Yardley 



Page 12 




HANS 



TF you see someone lurking in the shadows, don't 
be afraid, it's just tlie Httle man who's always there, 
everyone's pal, Hans. He is also known as the keeper 
of the keys and night watchman. Hans is the man 
who sees all, hears all, and tells nothing. 




We're going to make you Hans' assistant, Charlie. 



Page i3 



S ONE of many entering upon a new 
phase of life, Charlie discovers that 
there are adjustments to be made. Once 
more, at the bottom of a new ladder of 
attainment and recognition, he begins 
til I limb — each step a new proof of his 
\ alue in a democratic community. 



FINDING 




If I'm studying, wake me up. 



Pane iU 



'T"0 ASSIST him to establish a feeUng 
of unity between him and his class- 
mates, activities are arranged by organi- 
zations for his participation. Once 
initiated into campus life. Charlie lends 
himself to the task of making the four 
years here enjoyable and profitable for 
each member. 



OUR STRIDE 




You've had a hard night, Charlie! 



'HeeV 



Page 15 



Governing Bodies 

''■''HE powers of "justice"" and "punishment"" on L. \ . C.s campus rest in 
tlie hands of four cooperative bodies — the Men"s Senate for the dorm men, 
Women's Student Government Association ("Jigger Board") for dorm 
women. Men's Day Student Congress for (as the title indicates) day student 
men, and Women"s Commuters' Council for day student women. The powers 
of these four bodies range from that of sentencing a "dinkless" freshman to 
wear anything from a peach basket to a ribbon to the power of expulsion 
for major infractions of the rules. 

Eacli body enforces certain rules and by-laws within its respective domain, 
but their functions extend beyond this to the sponsoring of "rec hours," 
Christmas banquets and parlies, intramural sports, etc., in an attempt to 
unite the student body into a playing unit as well as a working unit. 



MEN'S SENATE 

John Dressler 

President 

Robert Hackman 

Vice-President 

Ralph Mease 

Secretary-Treasurer 





JIGGER BOARD 

Floda Trout 
President 

Josephine Ernst 
Vice-President 

Margaretta Carey 
Treasurer 

Ruth Heminway 

Secretary 



Page 16 



STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL 

Richard Bell 
President 

Joseph Carr 
Vice-President 

Edna Rutherford 

Secretary 





MEN'S DAY STUDENT 
CONGRESS 

Robert Rapp 

President 

Raymond Hess 

Vice-President 

Ralph Shay 

Secretary- Treasurer 



WOMEN'S COMMUTERS' 
COUNCIL 

Eloise Hollinger 
President 

Marjorie Kishbaugh 
Vice-President 

Louise Keller 

Secretary 

Mary Ellen Klopp 

Treasurer 



Page 17 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Freshman Year 

FRESHMEN 
FALL SPORTS 
DAD'S DAY 
SOCIETY NEWS 



Sophomore Year 

SOPHOMORES 
BASKETBALL 
CLUBS 



/'// be with you, folks, 



Page 18 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Junior Year 



JUNIORS 

MAY DAY 

JUNIOR PLAY 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

BASEBALL 

TENNIS 



Senior Year 



SENIORS 

CLUBS 

OUTSTANDING LEADERS 

BEAUTY SECTION 



. . through all the ups and downs oj this hook. " 



Page 19 




THE 

V 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



uillafMxni 



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'T'HE style of this annual probably 
deviates very much from the 
other annuals published. We hope 
it does not fall too much below the 
level of interpreting college life on the 
campus. Its style is unadorned. 

Our title page picture is an aerial 
view of the campus, but in the re- 
mainder of the book we endeavor to 
give you a down-to-earth, honest 
cross section of college activity on 
our campus. Our pictures are 
unrehearsed, unconventional, and. 
above all, chosen for you. 




HONORING 



"CHRIS" GINGRICH 

ARE we acknowledging his laurels? Are we applauding his 
fame? Are we approving his good works? Are we proud of 
his degrees? 

Christian R. Gingrich did graduate from Franklin and Mar- 
siiall; he does practice law; he has been appointed the United 
States Appeal Officer for the Lebanon District; and he lias pre- 
pared articles for the Reader's Digesl. 

Rut when a dedication is made, honors and titles lose their 
influence. To the students "Chris" is a professor who gets off 
his subject, who cuts a class every year on the first day of hunt- 
ing season, and who gave many suggestions for this book. 




Page 22 




CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Professor 



DE DI CATION 



Page 23 





Charlie, it ain't polite to turn your back 



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Freshman Girls 



President Robert Kern 

Vice-President John Chambers 

Secretary Dorothy Jean Light 

Treasurer Theodore Bachman 



Baker, Martha Jane 
Bernhard, Virginia Claire 
Converse, Barbara Elizabeth 
Dougherty, Elizabeth Mary 
Erhlich, Ethel Frances 
Focht, Bettie Irene 
FoLTz, Leah Susan 
FoRNOFF, Hazel Jane 
Garland, Jean Louise 
Graybill, Ruth Janet 
Grube, Mary Elizabeth 
Harnish, Charlotte Eugenia 
Haverstock, Ruth Emily 
Keenan, Mary Doris 
KoHLER, Miriam Owen 
Kreider, Marian Mark 
Kreiser, Elizabeth Amy 
Landis, Dorothy Hope 



Light, Dorothy Jean 
Light, Elizabeth Jean 
Light, Janet Naoma 
Ling, Minnie Evelyn 
Miller, Emma Catherine 
Minnich, Betty Mae 
Moore, Judith Jane 
MoYER, Mary Elizabeth 
Seavers, Garneta Louise 
Shannon, Jo Marie 
Stonecipher, Verna Pauline 
TippERY, Miriam Winifred 
Trautman, Marilyn Esther 
Wagner, Esther May 
Wilt, Martha Elizabeth 
Yeakle, Mary Martha 
YocuM, DeLene Winifred 



Page 26 



Adlestein, Max Pitt 
Albert, J. Ross 
Bachman, James Smith 
Bachman, Theodore Brandt 
Bashore, Sidney Milne 
Beamesderfer, Samuel Hower 
BouDER, Norman Martin, Jr 
Brubaker, Dale 
Carbaugh, John Edward, Jr. 
Chambers, John Delmar 
Cohen, Gene Udelle 
DeHuff, John Andrew 
Dorazio, Nicolas Walter 
Down, John Louis 
Edwards, George Ervin 
FiDLER, Kenneth Richard 
Fisher, Paul Gottshall 
Frantz, Charles Paul 
Gerace, Anthony Joseph 
Gerhard, Kenneth Raymond 
GiLLY, George Joseph 
Hall, John Wenhich 
HoERNER, Richard James 

HOFFMEISTER, NeD AtTICKS 

HoLLiNGER, Clayton Elias, Jr. 
Hummel, John Paul, Jr. 
JiRAS, Edgar Joseph 
Kern, Emil Robert 
Kline, Ralph Riley 
KuRiLLA, Michael 
Light, David L., Jr. 
Light, Warren Edgar 
Matula, Robert E. 
McFadden, John Cloyd, Jr. 



Miller Charles Robinson, Jr. 
Miller, Harry Kreiger 
Mikilo, Michael 
Morrill, Joseph Frederick 
MowREY, Wayne Lytle 
Mover, Kenneth Harold 
Neidig, Howard Anthony 
Neuman, Charles Thompson 
Newbaker, Charles Edward, Jr. 
Nicholas, Blake Harold 
Nichols, Joseph Edward 
Reed, Carroll Melvin 
Rubin, Bernard Freedman 
Russo, Armand 
Rutter, Leon William 

SCHAEFFER, JaCOB RoBERT, 

Sharman, Charles Winfield, Jr. 
Smalley, Lester Randolph, Jr. 
Smith, Alton Matthew 
Souders, Bruce Chester 
St.-insfield, Edward Eugene 
Stein, Samuel Elmer 
Stine, George Clayton, Jr. 
Swindell, Herbert Van Arden 
Troup, Earl Albert 
Under, Franklin Hertzler 
Urban, James Robert 
Well, Jesse David HI 

WiNEMILLER, RoBERT AlLEN 

Wise, John Roy 
WiTMEYER, Clyde Richard 
Wolfe, Charles William 
Yannaccone, Robert 
Zerbe, John Emanuel 



Freshman Boys 






i i ttff !■ i^Bi 



The Athletic Council 



' I ''HE athletics and participation in varsity sports of Lebanon Valley are conducted 
and planned by the Atiiletic Council limited to seven men. At the present time 
this council consists of Prof. C. R. Gingrich, chairman, Dr. Amos Black, secretary, 
C. G. Dotter, treasurer. Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, Coach Jerome Frock, Dr. M. L. 
Stokes, and Prof. Frederick Miller. The administration, feeling the need of a more 
efficient or specific organization to determine athletic problems, proposed a council 
such as this a few years ago. 

The wisdom of some of their advocated athletic programs and policies in the past 
has ably justified its control along the realms of sport, for not only has it benefited 
the teams of our college, but the student body as a whole. 

The Council has not designated any special time for meeting, but decides on 
various problems when the occasion arises, the meeting being called by the chair- 
man of the Council. 

The Council's actions are centered around one generalized duty, that of deciding 
policies related to all varsity sports. 



Page 28 




Bingo 



Football — a game that makes strong men weak — a game that calls for heart, 
courage, fight and intestinal fortitude — a game that builds character — a game 
that builds men. 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



SCHEDULE 

L.V. C. 0pp. 

Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster, Pa. .0 21 

Arkansas A. and M. at Hershey, Pa 27 6 

Moravian College at Bethlehem, Pa. . ; . . 3 20 

Penna. Military College at Lebanon, Pa. .16 19 

(Homecoming game) 

Blue Ridge College at New Windsor, Md. .6 

Upsala College at Lebanon, Pa 27 14 

Albright College at Reading, Pa 3 

University of Delaware at Wilmington, Del. . 16 



Lebanon Valley experienced its worst football season since Jerry Frock assumed 
the coaching duties of the "Flying Dutchmen." They won only three of the eight 
games scheduled, although only three vacancies were created by graduation. Last 
fall Coaches Frock and Intrieri experirriented with a squad of twenty-five gridders, 
the smallest group to report for a Blue and White football team in recent years. 
As a consequence, they found themselves lacking replacements throughout the 
season when several first-string performers suffered injuries that kept them from 
the gridiron for a number of contests. 



Page 29 



>i 61 








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TN ANALYZING the 1940 season, it is found 
-'- tliat opponents bested the Flyhig Dutchmen 
in five encounters. But not all is revealed by a 
glance at the win and loss columns. In the 
contests with P. M. C. and Albright, the Valley 
just lacked the necessary punch to gain victory. 
In the meeting with Moravian, a series of 
disastrous pass interceptions forced L. V. C. 
to forget about its overland attacks, which had 
worked up to that point. A well-rounded 
conservative offensive and defensive game, 
with strict attention to fundamentals and no 
unorthodox departures, was stressed by the 
coaches from the first practice. 

A quintet of seniors. Captain Bosnyak, 
Kuhn, Bakow, Ciamillo and Grabusky, led 
the fourteen gridders who were accorded 
varsity recognition for their sterling perform- 
ances. The group of nine lettermen who will 
form the nucleus of the 1941 team includes 
Captain-elect Schillo, Staley, Shay, Schmalzer, 
Matala, Eniinhizer, Dorazio, Busso and Hall. 




^y,,-- 




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"Are you sure you're going the right tvay, Charlie: 



Page 30 




Jerry Frock 

\ QUIET, determined man of 
-^*- few words, but gruelling 
action, is Jerry Frock, head coach 
of the Flying Dutchmen. Him- 
self a block off the old L. V. C. 

chip of football stars his 

hard-working drills prove him a 
product of the old school. 



Mike Intrieri 

IVfIKE Intrieri, line coach is 
-'-'-'- just two years removed from 
his own line position with the 
Boston Redskins. A shrewd, 

untiring driller a likable, 

laughable bruiser with a snappy 
effective lingo. 



Page 31 




ENDS: Play-srnaslier Bruno Grabusky, Pass-receiver Don Slaley, Scrappy Sieve kubisen. Versatile Joe Carr, Tovfcrin;; John Ncwma 
TACKLES: Sturdy Hank Schmalzer, Hard-charging Jerry Novick, Fighting Art Russo, Plugger George Gilly, Burly Joe Morrill 
GUARDS: Captain Fred Bosnyak, Steady Johnny Eminhizer, Promising John Hall, Aggressive Ralph Shay. 




CENTERS: Mighty Mite Alex Rakow, Hardworking Johnny Swope. 

BACKS: Hard-driving Frankie Kuhn, Captain-elect Ed Schillo, Balller Harry Matala, Vicious Teddy Ciamillo, Shifty Nick Dorazio, Elusive Mike Mikilo, 
Slippery George Smith, Midget Ned Hoffmeister, Southpaw Charley Newbaker. 







Tlie fellows arc mixing up 
P. M. C. If you were 
there, you'll know it came 
outV. L. insteadofC.M.P. 



F. & M. club put the "and" 
back in F. & M. in this 
game (no crack). 











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HERE are our first-string men 
picked upon merit alone by 
Coaches Frock and Intriori. "iMike" 
and Jerry look them over very care- 
fully before the boys line up in the 
first string of players. Mike works 
with the line fellows, watching them 
closely for both ability and stability. 
The players shown here earned their 
places on the line. "Jerry," the best 
in backfield coaching in these parts, 
selects the backfield. Frock is sure of 
his men when he picks them. He 
likes men who play football for 
football's sake. 



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THIS football is not all glory; 
it's a lot of hard work. These 
fellows come back two weeks early 
every year. During these two weeks 
they practice in the mornings, eat, 
rest, and then practice again in the 
afternoon. However, the boys do 
have Sunday off. Needless to say 
all are in bed early, for they know 
only too well that tomorrow means 
practice in the morning and after- 
noon again. 




■5i'JW;!*isS:-iS.ni! 



Here he comes! 



Page .?9 




The Band 

C()i\IE people jrel a kick out of the 
'^Band drills at lialftime. That "zip- 
py feeling" pervades everyone when 
our Band starts "struttin" its stuff." 
Well, anyway, above is a picture of 
our Band "goin' to town" at a gridiron 
game on the Lebanon field. Besides 
that, there are both the Boys' and Girls" 
Bands. 

Ed McFerren (to tlie right) sure does 
look like a real drum major in that 
head-gear. The picture was taken at 
a game at Lebanon. 



"//e shall make music" 



Page iO 




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TEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE sported a line-up of six 
yelling, energetic (and according to the pictures), food- 
loving cheerleaders along the 50-yard line territory this year. 
A leaping, tumbling ensemble in blue and white, whose cheers 
gave a new spirit to the Flying Dutclimen. In spite of the fact 
that they did not have a very cooperative student body, their 
"umph" remained constant and their persuasions to "Come on, 
yell" never ran down. A loyal sextet whose job was well done. 




Lead Cheers 



Page hi 




L" Men 



' I ''HIS is iiol a club for lliosc who liavc ridck'ii on 
the olovaled line in one of our larjier cities. It 
is a strong organization of all the fool ball, base- 
ball and basketball men wlio June earned llie 
varsity "L." 

The nienibership is eoni[)arati\('l\ small, but 
only because of the necessary amount of mental 
and physical ell'orl recjuired for entrance. In- 





chided ill I he enlraiice requirements is an initia- 
tion, the like of which the eligible caiuiidale lias 
never before experienced. 

Some of you may say that this club means iKilh- 
ing to you, for you shall never be a member of it. 
'J'his is not necessarily true. Your presence on the 
campus may contribute greatly to its support 

and success. 



l^age '/? 



t'VERY girl in a sport, and a sport for every 
girl," the motto of the W. A. A., is a maxim 
which suggests not only learning new games and 
acquiring definite skills in old ones, but an equal 
opportunity for an active sports program to 
"varsity Sues" and less experienced players alike. 

Points acquired by participation in both intra- 
mural and inter-mural sports make a girl a W. A. A 
member. Letters and other awards are presented 
at the spring banquet to "high scorers" in this 
point system. A three-season program keeps the 
sport ball rolHng. Hockey, tennis, soccer, and 





basketball have their chance throughout the fall 
and winter, while volleyball, softball, tennis and 
archery are sported in the spring. 

Some "firsts" in this year's W. A. A. program 
were the hockey banquet, the W. A. A. song, the 
fencing group, and the Christmas hike. Some 
"seconds" include a tentative square dance and a 
basketball playday at home. These playdays, 
which combine fun and sociability with good 
sportsmanship and strategic playing, are especially 
anticipated. 



"They're 'W. A. A.' in Sports!" 





Dads 



"T^HE Sevcnlh Annual "Dad's Day," November 
7, was marked by a series of baek-slapping 
greetings by father to son, hand-shaking intro- 
ductions of fatiier to father, and a general mas- 
culine wise-cracking, pipe-smoking fellowship. 
The sons dished out samples of dormitory life, 
wliile dads, per usual, dished out cash in payment 
for honored positions in the popular bull sessions. 

In the afternoon, the football team added its 
share toward a successful day by trouncing 
Upsala 27-14 before 75 dads of both "day" and 
"stay" students. Remarks like the following 
could be heard throughout the afternoon, "That's 
my son out there!" "All I can say is, football ain't 



what it used to be." "Now when I was young " 

An afternoon in the air does things to keen 
young appetites, but dads evidently are sus- 
ceptible to the same influence. After a banquet 
served by the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet in the evening, 
Eddie was obliged to change his menu for the 
next day because there wasn't a thing left for hash. 
Marlin Espenshade, president of the Y.M.C.A., 
acted as master of ceremonies, and Bob Dresel, 
vice-president, welcomed the dads in behalf of 
the sons. Dr. Ritchie extended greetings from 
the faculty after which Dr. Black spoke in his 
usual snappy manner, which made a hit with 
fathers and sons alike. 



Page 44 







The dads are never left to shift for 
themselves during their allotted 
twenty-four hours of each year. They 
are always taken care of. If they have 
never seen our campus, they are shown 
around; they meet all the boys. Our 
guests are also taken off campus. 
During the afternoon they witness a 
football game. This year the dads saw 
the home team take Upsala over the 
coals. You brought us good luck, dads! 




Page 45 



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L. V. Clubbers 



T^HIS singular personality is a rare 
combination of "bossman" and 
'"grandma." In one breath she yells at 
the team to "fight" with all the steam she 
can muster and in the next she mothers 
"her chickens," victory or defeat. A real 
builder-upper, a good scout and a lovable 
lady — Miss Henderson. 




Page 46 



TTOCKEY, one of the most popular girls' sports at 
-'--'- Lebanon Valley, interested more girls this year 
than ever before. The girls, from Frosh to Senior, 
showed up faithfully at practices and games with 
smiling faces and fine spirits. They wanted to keep 
hockey on a fun-and-health basis, and at the same 
time, learn to use good hockey technique. 

This year the L. V. girls, under the guidance of 
Miss Henderson, their coach, encouraged hockey 
games between high schools by inviting some local 
school girls to come to our field for games. Our team 
watched these games and gave some pointers, and 
gave a little competition to the hockey beginners 
from Myerstown High and Swatara Township High. 
This is a pohcy which Lebanon Valley would like 
to see carried further in the future hockey seasons. 

Before putting away their sticks and shin guards, 
the hockey team gathered 'round a banquet table 
for a last look at hockey and players in general. 
They heard Miss Claudia Robb, from Shippensburg, 
speak inspiringly on the place women's athletics 
holds in building democracy, and they learned that 
grand new W. A. A. song composed by Martha 
Davies. You'll hear them singing it again and again 
from now on. L. V. can't forget that this year's 
season was quite successful, despite the scoreless 
games. Haven't we a most experienced group of 
up-and-coming Sophs and Juniors for next season .>> 
Every girl had a chance to develop her skill and show 
what she could do. So signs of victory after victory 
smile down on Lebanon Valley's hockey team for 
next year. 

At the beginning of the season, with only a few 
days' practice behind them, the girls encountered 
the "supercision" playing of the Harrisburg Hockey 
Club and held them to a low score of 2-0. Later, 
when meeting their beloved rivals, Shippensburg, 
L. V. showed better defense work. The star for- 
wards. Wilt, Hammond and Crone, drove power- 
fully toward the goal many times, but seemed to 
lack that final "push" that puts the little white ball 
over the line. The game ended to 2. Every one of 
the favored fifteen enjoyed immensely their games 
at the annual Hockey Play Day held this year at 
Susquehanna University. There was plenty of 
socializing besides the four games and the instructive 
discussions about hockey-stick work among our 
girls and those of Shippensburg, Cedar Crest, and 
Susquehanna. 




Page 47 





TTOIJSE lights grow dim, footliglits grow bright, 
■*- a hush goes over the audience, tlie curtains 
part in the httle theatre on the nortlieast corner of 
L. V.'s campus on the first production of 1940-41. 
The Wig and Bucklers take us to England to 
learn "The Importance of Being Earnest." Same 
setting, later in the Thespian season, arrival in 
France via "Poor Richard" manned by the 
Junior Class. Still later the Kalo-Delphians and 
Clio-Philo players take their curtain calls. 

Behind the scenes — by special permission — 
glimpses through a haze of powder, whiskers 
being spirit-gummed, eyes staring "Up, now down, 
please," old women rising from chairs where young 
girls sat. Sniff the snuff that explains the unique 
cavorting — it's Grease Paint brand. Succumbants 
to that whiff enlist to white-plaster paint fu'eplaces, 
pad chairs into "chaise lounges," announce "Mr. 
X awaits witliout" or "I love you" in the next 
vehicle. It even braces ambitious Seniors to 
direct their own one-act plays. 



Beckoning to 



Make -Believe 




"The Importance of 
Being Earnest" 

'T^HE Importance of Being Earnest" 
-*• gave six footlight-struck Wig and 
Bucklers the opportunity to star with the 
result of a whole galaxy of twinklers 
turning out a witty Wilde story of mis- 
taken and fictitious identities. Giving 
interpretations of the would-be Ernests 
were David Spittal and David Gockley 
with Jane Baker and Ellen Ruppers- 
burger being captivated by the name. 
Martha Jane Koontz, Betty Minnich 
and Dennis Sherk created the "character" 
roles. 




"The Diabolical Circle" 

PRECEDED by an original skit by Dr. Struble 
-*- on the make-up of "diabolic" as well as . 
angelic character, the one-act play "The Diaboli- 
cal Circle," introduced a cycle of such productions 
to be presented by Senior members of the club. 
Offering a rigorous, yet charming sketch of early 
Puritan life, the plot included the bewitching 
daughter of a typical scripture-quoting forefather, 
played by Genevieve Stansfield and CaroU Reed, 
respectively and the foil suiter roles of gallant yet 
sincere youth versus a hypocritical lover of the 
world ably handled by David Gockley and Harold 
Maurer respectively. The play was directed by 
Frank Shenk. 



Page 49 




Page 50 




Page 51 



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Clionians 



President . . Betty Anne Rutherford 
\'ice-Presiitenl .... Ruth HE^HNW.■VY Treasurer .... M.'Vrjorje Kishb.\ugh 

Corresponding Secretary Mildred Cross Olive Branch . . Genevieve St.\nsfield 

Recording Secretary . . . Fav Brigham Anniversary President . Luella Schindel 



'T^HK Cliunian Literary Society, the second 
oldest society on tiie campus, celebrated its 
seventieth anniversary this year. The group was 
first organized as a literary society with Minerva, 
the goddess of wisdom, as the patron goddess, but 
now it functions more as a social organization. 
Meetings arc held in the society room in North 
Hall, as well as many informal galherings. In Ihe 
beginning of Ihe school year, numerous activities 
are arranged for the freshmen. There is the hike, 
the tea, joint sessions witli llie oilier socielies, 
and finally the culminalit)n of all these, the 
irnlialion. This year, a very impressive formal 
inilialion was held in addition to the usual in- 
formal one. The highlight of the social season is 
the Formal Anniversary Dance which was held 
this year at the Hotel Abraham Lincoln in liead- 
ing. The society also combines with Philo to 
present a play the eve of May Day. 



Page 52 





Kalos 



George Grow . . 
Ralph Mease . . 
Ralph Shay . . . 
Carl Sherk . . . 
Alex Rakow . . 
Lorin Fleming . 
Warren Silllman 
William Steele 
John Eminhizer 
George Wilkialis 



President Theodore Ciamillo 

Vice-President Earl Boltz 

Corresponding Secretary Ralph Shay 

Recording Secretary Joseph Carr 

Treasurer 

Chaplain Stephen Kubisen 

Sergeant-al-Arms Robert Kern 

Nick Dobazio 
Armand Russo 




' I ''HIS was the second literary society organized 
for men on campus. This group, which is 
socially progressive, has followed the modern 
trend of college societies. They strive with a great 
deal of eagerness for the promotion of fraternity, 
companionship, and friendliness. Kalo was 
founded as a rival to Philo and has always taken a 
very active part in the campus social life. Through 
the Smoker, Play and Anniversary Dinner Dance, 
the Kalos exhibit the feeling of "When good 
fellows get together." 



Page 53 




Delphians 



President . . . 
Vice-President .... Josephine Ernst 
Recording Secretary .... Viola Snell 
Corresponding Secretary Marjorie Holly 



. . Fehne Poet 
Treasurer .... Elizabeth Sattasahn 

Critic Betty Gravell 

Anniversary President Edna Rutherford 



F^ELPHIAN Literary Society, in spite of its 
youtli, is one of tlie well-established literary 
societies. Guided by the Oracle of Delphi, the 
girls made rushing season, including several joint 
sessions, a "lacy beribboned" tea and a welcoming 
hike, "one swell time." 



r" 



Page 54 





Robert Hackman . 
Robert Nichols . . 
Richard Owen . . 
Carroll McFerren 
Bob Hambright . . 
George Bryce . . 
Walter Eeersole 
Bob Ness 



Philos 

President Bill McKnight 

Vice-President Bob Dresel 

Secretary Donald Glen 

Treasurer Donald Bartley 

Chairman of Executive Committee 

Sergeants-at-Arms Ed. Stanspield 

Harry Miller 
Richard Seiverling 




'/~kNCE a Philo Always a Philo." This fraternal 
organization lias realized the values of co- 
operation, good will and friendship. It has always 
held high the standards of true comradeship 
which are necessary for a well-rounded life. This 
Society always takes an active part in the opening 
program of the four societies and has joint sessions 
with both Clionian and Delphian Literary so- 
cieties. Through such agencies as joint sessions, 
periodical meetings, and smokers for Freshmen, 
true comradeship has been held high. 



Page 55 




involving the two servants brilliantly 
(no other word would be adequate) 
played by Dennis Sherk and Peggy 
Boyd, and the third corner in two love 
triangles, suave but stiff Bill Bender, 
and last but not least, John Lynch, 
quite dashing in uniform. 

Of course the "chocolate-cream raer- 
cenarie" gets the girl — why shouldn't 
he? 




T>EBNARD Shaw's "Arms and the Man" 
■^ was the vehicle chosen for the May Day 
eve capers of Philo-Clio would-be dramatic 
artists. 

Shaw's philosophic-comic take-off on war 
revolves around "the chocolate-cream soldier" 
— earnestly but just a little ineffectively 
"mugged" by Harold Maurer — a fugitive from 
the Servian army who finds his way into the 
bedroom of an opposing leader's daughter, 
Raina — naively interpreted by Ellen Ruppers- 
burger. An interesting sidelight was Maurer's 
nonchalance when he inadvertently forced the 
bedspring from the one corner post. 

The plot involves some difficulties and 
humorous situations in keeping with the "Sha- 
vian" tradition. Interest was maintained by the 
very vigorous action of Ralph Lloyd as Major 
PetkofF, tlie superb portrayal of his scheming 
wife by Martha Jane Koontz, the sub-plot 



Page 56 




IT'ALO-Delphian's contribution to 
the boards for the 1939-40 season 
was Sidney Barry's "The Youngest." 
The spotlight was held by Dick Bald- 
win as "The Youngest" member of a 
big-time pin and needle manufacturing 
family whose literary talents were the 
"fly in the ointment" of the otherwise 
well-oiled and profit-gathering clan. 
The plot reaches its climax when the 





"baby," goaded on by the subtle guidance of a 
fair young visitor in the house — the love 
interest, ingenuously played by Carolyn 
Kissinger — turns the tables in a mild revolu- 
tion during a very appropriate Fourth of July 
celebration. He transfers the reins of power in 
the little pin-and-needle empire from the hands 
of the "heavies" — his business-monger brothers 
adeptly played by Frank Shenk and "Obie" 
Oberholtzer — to his own control. 

Very pleasing background action was sup- 
plied by Barbara Bowman as the ultra-sophis- 
ticated sister of the family; Joe Carr as her 
easy-to-look-at but completely controlled hus- 
band; Martha Davies as the charming, knit- 
ting, bewildered mother of the brood; Louise 
Boger as the attractive, and lively younger 
sister; and the epitome of efficiency — maid, 
Mary Grace Light. 

All in all, a "bang-up" performance to say 
the least! 



Page 57 




Page 58 





Hoiv do you feel after the football game, Charlie: 



Page 59 






f .^^ 




^>df^^M^dll.iiiill^li^m 



Sophomore Girls 

President Carl ^^'EIDMAN 

Vice-President Donald Bartley 

Secretary Marian Kreider 

Treasurer Cyril Little 



BoESHORE, Anna Mae 
Brigham, Laura Fay 
Brine, Dorothy Louise 
Carey, Margaretta Adelaide 
Carl, Shirley Chaitt 
Carter, Doris Lorraine 
Collins, Ann B. 
Crone, Martha Louise 
Daugherty, Jean Louise 
Deibler, Kathryn Savilla 
DuNKLE, Emma Catherine 
Emrich, Betty Mae 
Gruber, Jane Gingrich 
Hammond, Joyce 
Johns, Mary Elizabeth 
Keller, Dorothy Pauline 
Keller, Emma Louise 
Kerr, Elizabeth Krause 



Klopp, Mary Ellen 
Klucker, Dorothy Jane 
Kreider, Marian Catharine 
Kreider, Buth Leah 
Kreider, Verna Laura 
March, Dorothy Louise 
Mehaffey, Mary Elizabeth 
Morrison, Helen Alice 
Bobertson, Jessie Custer 
ScHOPF, Janet Marie 
Sherk, Katharine Jane 
Smith, Doris Chittick 
Smith, Grace Eleanore 
Smith, Jane Evelyn 
Stansfield, Genevieve Marie 
Stine, Evelyn Justina 
Witmer, Leona Almeda 
Witmeyer, Eleanor Louise 



Page 60 



Bamberger, John Alexander 
Bartley, Donald Francis 
Beckner, Richard Best 
Bryce, George Wendell 
Crall, Lloyd Hornberger 
Detambel, Marvin Harold 
Donmoyer, William McKinley, Jr. 
Ebersole, Walter King 
Eminhizer, John Wesley, Jr. 
Engle, Robert Melvin 
Fleming, Lorin Eugene 
Frantz, Frederick Strassner 
Fritsche, Herman Alvin 
Garbade, Albert Martin 
George, Walter John 
Germer, Meredith J. 
Hampton, John Ellis 
Heagy, John Garfield 
Heiland, Robert Elmer 
Heilman, Robert Arthur 
Hocker, John Brendle 
Immler, Richard Andrew 
Little, Cyril James 
Matala, Harry Nicholas 



Maurer, Harold William, Jr. 
Metro, Stephen Joseph 
Meyer, George Koehler 
Morrison, Albert Harold 
Ness, Robert Kiracafe 
Oberholtzer, Harry Irving 
Paine, Russel Howard 
Patschke, Franklin Edward 
Phillips, John Richard 
Pollock, Elmer Clement 
Rhodes, Jacob Lester, Jr. 

SCHMALTZER, HeNRY WaLTER 

Shaner, David Willard 
Sherk, Herman Dennis 
Silliman, Warren Benjamin 
Steele, William Hopper 
Talnack, John Paul 
Uberseder, Hans William 
Lhrich, Robert Walter 
Weidman, John Carl 
Whistler, Robert George 
WiLKiALis, George Walter 
Yeatts, LeRoy Brough, Jr. 
Yestadt, James Francis 



Sophomore Boys 




Basketeers 



AN INSIGHT into the routine followed by the members of the Varsity 
"^ basketball squad presents an interesting picture. The home games 
are played on the Lebanon High floor, and although each player is given 
a sum total of thirty cents for transportation on the bus to and from Lebanon, 
the majority of the fellows prefer to hitch-hike. Upon their arrival at the 
gym they usually sit leisurely in the stands with the spectators and watch 
the Frosh game. At half-time, however, they leave the stands, make their 
way to the dressing-rooms, and proceed to dress for their game. The coach 
gives them a pep talk, and when the Frosh game is over, they make their 
entrance onto the floor. 

When the Varsity and Freshman squads journey to other schools, a bus is 
chartered for their transportation. Just before their departure they feast 
themselves upon a repast of burnt toast, peas, and steak, without accompany- 
ing dessert. On the road their favorite pastime is playing pinochle, the 
baggage trunk serving as a table. At half-time during the game they are 
given plenty of oranges and lemons. After the game the menu consists of 
tongue sandwiches and milk, but the tongue sandwiches never seem to be 
very popular. These are just a few interesting facts regarding the rather 



Page 62 



routine life that the Varsity player leads during 
the basketball season. 

At the bottom is a candid shot of Lebanon 
Valley's cage quintet just before the start of 
one of the home games held in the Lebanon 
High Gym. The team has come off the floor 
after practicing and warming up for the game 
and has gathered in a huddle around Coach 
Intrieri to receive last-minute instructions. 
This is a tensely dramatic moment ; the specta- 
tors nervously await the opening tip-off; the 
players' hopes for a victory are high; and in a 
moment they will break away and play their 
best until the final gun, whether they win or 
lose. Such a scene as this occurs at every game. 




Isn't that suit a little loose for you, Charlie? 




Bask-snaps 




Dodgers 



A S a youngster on the sports curriculum of Lebanon Valley, the fencing team has shown up 
-^*- admirably since its formation last November. Using two weapons, foil and sabre, the team 
fights three men on each. 

Foilsman Dick Phillips, Maurie Erdman and Herm Fritsche hold their positions in the order 
named. On sabres are Stewie Zimmerman, Bon Rapp and George Bryce respectively. Lacking the 
services of a regular coach, the above-mentioned group showed up very well against the Philadelphia 

College of Pharmacy and Science in their first 
match. Each of the fellows will be frank in 
admitting that this match gave every one of 
them the D. T.'s until they got on the fencing 
strip. 

Following this match was the Lafayette 
team, a grand bunch of well-coached sports. 
If the team ever had shaky knees it was in this 
match, for the opponents were a mighty scrappy 
team of fighters. With Franklin and Marshall, 
Harrisburg Y. M. C. A., Gettysburg and Phil- 
adelphia College of Pharmacy and Science also 
on the schedule, the team is preparing for an 
even tougher schedule next year. We feel sure 
that the entire student body is behind us in 
congratulating this group on their fine work. 




Page 65 




First Yearlings 



nPHIS year's Fresliman squad, coached by J. W. Frock, consists of Harry Miller, Charles Miller, 
Light, Kern, Dorazio, Russeau, and Newman. Of the afore-mentioned no one player is out- 
standing in all of the games. Each one comes in for his share of swishing the cords. Each of these 
lads has played on his respective high school team and this year showed much promise for future 
L. V. C. squads. 



FRESHMEN 
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

January 4 . . . Hershey Industrial School at Lebanon 

January 8 Ursinus at Collegeville 

January 11 . . . Franklin and Marshall at Lebanon 

January 14 ... . Hershey Junior College at Hershey 

January 18 Muhlenberg at AUentown 

January 21 Dickinson at Carhsle 

January 25 Gettysburg at Gettysburg 

February 1 Albright at Reading 

February 4 . . . Hershey Industrial School at Hershey 

February 6 Muhlenberg at Lebanon 

February 12 ... . Hershey Junior College at Lebanon 

February 19 Gettysburg at Lebanon 

February 2.5 Ursinus at Lebanon 

February 27 ... Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 

March .5 Albright at Lebanon 



Page 66 





THE make-up and tactics of this year's Frosh 
squad resembled last year's "Circus" team in 
certain aspects. Again, this year, the Frosh have 
"taken it on the chin" in most of their games. They 
weren't successful enough to wind up on the long 
end of the score in many of their games, but this 
does not mean that they weren't a formidable foe to 
any team that they engaged. One outstanding 
diiference this year was the lack of any individual 
performances that could compare with the antics of 
a couple of the members of last year's team. 

Life is not a bed of roses for any of the candidates 
for the Freshman squad. After the candidate really 

makes the team, practice begins in earnest late 

practice bruises stiff muscles late 

supper, all in a day's work. These boys really de- 
serve credit for the amount of effort and enthusiasm 
which they put into their daily workouts. Then 

comes the game the fight for the ball a 

mad scramble a basket or two from the 

opening whistle to the final gun it's one grand fight, 
for the boys are in the game to win or else — 



Page 67 



They're off! Who's got the ball? Oh! 
It's through the hoop — for the other team! 

L. V. has the ball whistle foul 

two free tosses for the visitors 

they're off again! our lads are really 

fightin' now two baskets in a row 

cheers from the stands another foul 

too bad, no tripping allowed the 

last quarter both teams are giving out 

everything they have the final 

whistle, and another game becomes history 

in the dressing-room talking it over 

"tough breaks," or "it was a swell 

game." Either way it was a contest well 
worth witnessing. 





Women Hoopers 



4 FEW weeks after hockey sticks are slielved for the winter, L. V. C. co-eds 
■^ begin to feel the basketball fever which soon spreads from the tallest 
prospective guard to the shortest veteran forward. This year the feminine 
basketeers got into the swing of things earlier than previous years and spent 
several practices before Christmas subjecting themselves to Miss Henderson's 
grueling "duck walks'" and other calisthenics designed to stimulate the pep 
and endurance of slack athletes. Old players brushed up on plays and new 
ones devoted their energies to learning techniques and picking up the general 
spirit of L. V. C. basketball. 

The season opened with a short tournament of inter-class games which was 
discontinued because of a lack of upper classmen. This tournament was then 
substituted by inter-dorm competition, and the usual spirit of friendly rivalry 
was immediately let loose. The yeUing and pep of these games is enough to 
make even the Men's Day Student League sound like a game of tiddledywinks. 

The mainstays of this year's squad consists of "Bobby" Herr, a fast, un- 
ruffled forward whose "hush shots" soon roll up a high score; "Izzie" Shatto, 
the one Senior player whose consistent excellence at defense has made her a 
valuable player throughout her four years as an honor team player; "Pete" 
Geyer, tlie guard with "the heave;" and "Nicky" Whitmeyer, a "tops" 
basketball leader and an "ace" guard. Among other prominent upper-class 
players are Jane Stabley, Mary Johns, Polly Keller, and Mary E. Klopp. 
Freshmen who soon showed an honor-team aptitude include Martha Wilt, 
Virginia Bernhard, Garneta Seavers, "Mickey" Ehrlich, and Marian Kreider. 

A team of upper classmen, started the season pulling together and bringing 
home tlie bacon from Shippensburg State Teachers College. This first victory 
was a "blitzkrieg" score of 29-7. The guards kept the Shippensburg forwards 



Page 68 




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Page 69 




Ink Spots 



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' t ■'HIS organization is not merely a group of 
-'- budding authors and journalists. It is rather a 
representative group of the college who are 
interested in literary culture and attainment. 
They meet each month at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. Struble to read manuscripts prepared before- 



hand, and to criticize and discuss the merits or 
shortcomings of these attempts at literature. 

Pictured left is Floda Trout, Green Blotter's 
Head Scop (president to you), whose promising 
literary productions reveal depth of thought and 
feeling .... modest sincere .... and cap- 
able both as writer and leader. 




Page 70 




German Clubbers 



THE German Club is the only one on the cam- 
pus that devotes itself entirely to the pursuit of 
a foreign language, which in this particular case 
seems to be German (although ninety-five per cent 
of the meetings are conducted in English). This 
Club, sponsored by the Fraulein Doktor Lietzau, 
interests itself in German culture of today and 
yesterday. 





Above is Dr. Lietzau, faculty adviser, seated at 
her desk in the Ad Building. 

To the left is Hans Uberseder, a member of the 
Club. 



Page 71 




lonists 



UNDER tlie guiding eye of Dr. Bender, tliese 
aspiring chemists meet twice montlily to 
discuss problems of present-day cliemistry, and 
the latest advances in scientific discovery. Ex- 
planations are made exceedingly interesting and 
worth while by the aid of sound motion pictures 
and lectures given by prominent men in various 
fields. 





A lowly Freshman occasionally makes use of the 
accumulated store of scientific knowledge pos- 
sessed by some helpful Senior and difficult prob- 
lems soon have a solution. 

More extensive experimentation is conducted by 
the advanced chemistry students which prepares 
them to meet the future trials and perplexities of 
science in industry. 



Page 72 



'T^HE picture below and the one to tlie right are 
-'- illustrations of the work that is done in the 
Tyrone Laboratories — a quick cross-section of life 
as spent by the biologists on L. V.'s campus. 
Whether pre-medical, pre-teacher, or simply pre- 
interested, many students find their home on the 
third floor of the Ad Building in the "lab." 
Many, too, in later life find their place in the 
world in a laboratory of some sort. 





The Biology Club has as its foundation the 
students who are interested in some of the new 
developments in medical science and in the biolog- 
ical sciences besides those discussed in the class- 
room. Various reports are given throughout the 
year at tiie monthly meetings. At other times 
outside speakers bring in very novel topics for 
discussion. Field trips are sometimes conducted 
by our adviser and sponsor. Dr. S. H. Derickson. 



Embryologists 





T^HE International Relations Club on our 
-'- campus is under the auspices of the Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace. One of 
many similar school organizations throughout the 
world, the Club aims, through intelligent reading 
and discussion, to become well informed regard- 
ing international affairs. 

This year the Club was fortunate in having 
Dr. Shivley, professor in the University of 
Doshisha, Japan, give an address on some of the 



vital questions concerning the Far East. All 
meetings are thrown open to a general discussion 
participated in by all the members. 

Below is Professor Miller, who has been act- 
ing as adviser to the local Club. 

To the left is Jane Ehrhart, President of the 
Club for the last two years. To frequenters of 
the library, it was a familiar sight to see Jane 
delving into the New York Times. 




International Relationists 





Debaters 




"C'EBRUARY of each year at Lebanon Valley 
-■- means the opening of the debating season 
with all the accompanying phenomena of reference 
work in the library, a general scurrying after 
profs to preside at debates, and the last breath- 
less rush to complete the year's schedule of verbal 
combats. 

A good turnout of debaters made the managers 
headaches a little less severe. There were Solomon 



Caulker, Joe Gittlen, Dick Rodes, Dave Spittal, 
Bob Mandle, Sam Gittlen, Earl Reber, Bob 
Whisler, Joe Carr, Bob Mays, George Wilkialis, 
and Don Bartley. 

Below is smiling Don Bartley, the manager of 
this year's debaters. He arranged a schedule with 
Moravian, Wagner, Muhlenberg, Hobart, William 
Smith College, Delaware U., Ursinus, Albright, 
and Elizabethtown. 




Page 75 




Recruiters 




' I ''HIS is a distinctly religious organization 
-*- whose belief is that it is just as important to 
become something as to learn something. Its 
membership consists of ministerial students and 
others who have dedicated their lives to high 
ideals and lofty purposes. Throughout the year 
they have conducted religious services in local 
churches and in many others distant from the cam- 
pus. A total of more than forty such deputations 



were made by members of the group this year. 

Opposite is President Charles Miller. Charlie 
is just as humorous as president as in any other 
situation. He enjoys a good joke any time: he 
does, however, have his serious side. A successful 
future is predicted for liim in the ministry. 

Francis Prutzman has handled the responsi- 
bility of secretary for the Life Work Recruits 
this year, and has made a fine job of it. 




Page 76 




Y. W. and Y. M. 



'T'HE success of such accepted college activities 
-*- as Freshman Week, Dad's Day, Mother's 
Week-End, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter 
early morning services, is due to the hard work 
of the Y. W. and Y. M. cabinets. Although the 
Y. W. and Y. M. are often "kidded" about their 
promotion of Christian activities, we are forced 
to ask ourselves the question, "What would the 
campus do without them?" 





Above is a picture of the presidents of the two 
"Y's." Anna Mae Bomberger and Marlin Espen- 
shade meet at Christmas-time and talk over plans 
for the New Year. If you can detect any broken 
Christmas balls on the floor, you can rest assured 
some of "the boys" did it. 



Page 77 




Around 




PRIVATE 
GROSSING 




Campus 




Page 80 





Expect to become a social lion now that 
you have a Packard, Charlie? 





JUNIOR 



JEAN PRISCILLA ANGER 

Just Jean - candid - impulsive and unpre- 
dictable - variety, her forte - worry, her 
attraction - and Albright, her weakness. 



IRENE MIRIAM RARBER 
Dark eyes flash naively - a New York twang 
breaks quiescence - maybe berating self - 
"Stay at these books." - "What about Fred.^" 



;.;?#^vo«^ 



^; ^ 




IRVIN RERMAN 

A serious, hard-working student - will win by 
sheer determination - seemingly bashful but 
only a cautious, slow starter. 



Page S2 




CLASS 



ROBERT JACOB BIEBER 

Trumpet-tootin', stogie-smokin' son-of-a-gun 
from Reading-up - so waltz me around again, 
Thelma. 



LOUISE ADELINE BOGER 

Sweet and "Silly" - coaxingly curious - her 
amazed look worth remembering - she "fiddles" 
away her excess energies. 




EARL WILLIAM BOLTZ 

Prospective history pedagogue - "axe" league 
luminary - card shark - cigarette bummer - 
would-be romanticist - pride and glee of A & P 
- Annville's pride and joy. 





Page 83 




JUNIOR 



ROSANNA MEYER BRANDT 

Newcomer this year - busy as a bee - timid 
self-conscious - good voice - sweet smile 
conscientious worker. 




Page 8^1 



KATHRYN ELIZABETH BREHM 

"Kitty" - sweets seller - Hummelstown Haus- 
fraulein - complaintless content - here's 
Brehm, always the same. 



JOSEPH EDWARD CARR 

"Uncle Joe," tall, dark, handsome boy with 
long and very witty vocabulary - to him goes 
the credit for being the originator of that well- 
known theory of the "Apple and the Orange" - 
"It's either an apple or an orange; it's not an 
apple plus or an orange minus." 




CLASS 



MARY LOUISE CLARK 

Smooth blonde sophisticate - modulated voice - 
a premedicate - coolly commands situations - 
smartly groomed - concentric group of friends 
vouch for her - patronizing. 




MARGARET ALICE COX 

There's only Juan (one) Don - piano tickler 
and work stickler - nondescript chuckle - 
cocker eyes - Vogue dresser - mercurial. 




MILDRED LOUISE CROSS 

Tantalizing green eyes - Stine's data-develop- 
ing damozel - a "reddy" friend - studious but 
not a recluse - accommodating - you gotta be a 
football hero to get along with this red-headed 




Page S5 






JUNIOR 



HERBERT SHENK CURRY 

Oberlin transfer - conserve - trumpet-swingster 
- commuter from Hershey - "Still water" - 
quiet broken by occasional declamation - 
good-natured. 



MARTHA ELIZABETH DAVIES 
Adroitly witty - originality - altruistic - 
stylist with pen and needle - enviable actress - 
knick-knacker - canary appetite but always on 
the wing. 



PHYLLIS ELIZABETH DEITZLER 
Just "Phyl" to us - theme song: "I've Been 
Working on the Railroad" - onion sandwiches - 
syncopator of smooth swing - unconsciously 
witty. 



Page 86 




CLASS 



GUY LUTHER DOBBS, JR. 

Jest Jack - h'English h' accent in a jolly good 
fellah - Biology laborer - nonsense talker and 
toasted cheeser - uh-huh! 



HARRY IVEN DRENDALL 
Quiet - meditative - studious - Harry possesses 
great musical talent - his humor frequently 
surprises those who are not so well acquainted 
with him. 



ROBERT FRANKLIN DRESEL 

Enthusiastic - sociable - always ready for a 
good time - Baker's son - can "add" them up. 





Page 87 







Page 88 



JUNIOR 



JAMES BARNET FELKER 

Quittie's best chauffeur - hangover from 
Lehigh - fulltime hobby in Nortliampton - 
should catcli the 8 o'clock train to the "Ad" 
building. 



PHOEBE RACHEL GEYER 

Wiiinie-the-Pooher and Little Luluer - sport 
devotee and participatee - sincere chum - keen 
student - contagious chuckle - personality 
quotient high. 



SAMUEL M. GITTLEN 

Harrisburg's Native Son - class agitator - 
liberator of the proletariat - socialized sonneter 
- jingle-judge. 




CLASS 



DONALD JAMES GLENN 

Quack veterinarian - rash hashdasher - high- 
quality heckler - responsible for much former 
disturbance on the "cliff." 



DAVID WOODROW GOCKLEY 
Dixie-Dutch accent - Ephrata's Gable - prac- 
tical joker - collegiate swagger - "swell fellow" 
- Reverend to be - foothght highlight. 



VIRGINIA WARFIELD GOODMAN 

A fine musician of undoubted ability - an 
organist - pianist - conscientious - dependable 
"Ginny on the spot" - Oh, yes, and let's not 
forget our "Good-man" Alex. 





Page 89 





Page 90 



JUNIOR 



GEORGIA BETTY GRAVELL 

Pep darts from dark eyes - self-confident - 
cooperative - pleasant to talk with - bouncing 
Betty and curly locks - hits the books - horsey 
interests. 



HERBERT RUSSELL GREIDER 

Strong silent type - pre-med major "Herbie" 
is the kind of guy who finishes something once 
it's begun - a "clifT-dweller" - can take his 
fun or leave it alone - usually has it. 



ROBERT MAURICE GUINIVAN 
Likable - popular - subtle sense of humor 
(putrid punner) - widespread social activities - 
high scholastic abihty - adept whip-cracker 
(we should know). 




CLASS 



KENNETH LAWRENCE GUTHRIE 

A transfer from Trinity College - bridge- 
shark - smoke fiend - unconventional - enjoys 
classical music - intelligent - "flash." 



ROBERT DANIEL HAMBRIGHT 

Boy with a "pretty" strong interest off campus 
- theme song, "She's Lovely" - big ideas - 
swell fellow - bit by more than a New Jersey 
mosquito. 



SARAH ELIZABETH HARTMAN 

"Sally" to friends - reliable - studious - de- 
mure - surprisingly witty - dignified - inde- 
pendent - resolute - reserved - plucky - a 
good listener - pleasingly plump. 





Page 91 




JUNIOR 



RUTH ESTHER HEMINWAY 

Something under her tawny, glamorous hair - 
pleasingly dominant - little bubbling giggle - 
dreams Breenily along - stately carriage - good- 
naturedly helpful. 



ANNA MARY HERR 

"Bobby" - attractive, sweet - "conserve" 
student - a winning way - neat in every re- 
spect - expressive brown eyes - "peep" shooter. 



^cx 




JUNE ELIZABETH HOLLINGER 

Day-studentette from down Lebanon way - 
conserve songstress and, incidentally, a singer 
of duets - jolly and light-hearted. 



\-.... 



Page 92 




CLASS 



MARJORIE ANNE HOLLY 
Versatile Holly - ingenious - friend in need 
dog-doter - haunts City of Brotherly Love 
infectious bellow - discerning. 




RUSSEL JOSEPH HORST 

"Dutch" but not dumb - cheerful and friendly 
- lends a hand anytime - neat and systematic 
chemist, believe it or not - re-incarnation of all 
chemists. 




THOMAS WILLIAM JACKSON 

"Sea Food" - future M. D. - hard-working 
student - bus boy and bell hop - flashing smile 
- driver of smooth-tired jalopy - pensive and 
easy-going. 





Page 93 




JUNIOR 



CAROLYN SARAH KISSINGER 

Stage siren - jitterbugess - interested in 
economics - and other things - enjoys a brisk 
walk - mind, men, and melody. 



LUCILLE KOONS 

Moon-face - constantly taunted about her 
broad "Dutch" accent - dark, demure - really 
lovely voice - enviably industrious. 



STEVEN JOSEPH KURISEN 

Pepsi-Cola addict - "culture" boy - hits books 
and erasers hard - cue-ball haircut - heads-up 
pivot man. 



Page M 




CLASS 



FREDERICKA LAUCKS 

"Freddie" - our own fashion-plate - striking - 
animated - friendly - and as effervescent as 
ginger ale - Miss Pep, Vim, and Vigor - the 
very height of naturalness. 




MARY GRACE LIGHT 

Extraordinarily proficient oboist - efficient 
student - likable personality - "everywhere 
that Mary goes, George is sure to follow." 



ROBERT JOSEPH MANDLE 

Hails from Johns Hopkins - great swimmer- 
station wagon de luxe - pungent humor - re- 
markable collection of records - endless variety 
of pipes - polished manners - unaffected. 





Page 95 




JUNIOR 



RALPH HECK MANWILLER 

Good vocalist - a promising conserve artist 
campus life - self-contained. 



MARGUERITE HELEN MARTIN 

Fun-loving - likable - lassie of the golden tan 
variety - frivolous tease - broad speech - bril- 
liant song - "conserve-s" time and energy - 
except over weekends??? 



ROBERT VERNON MAYS 

Clean-cut fellow - practices what he preaches - 
a student - oh, yes! A charming wife back 
home - "amaysing" weekend fellow. 



Page 96 




CLASS 



EDWARD CARROLL McFERREN 
"Mac" - another Stoke's protege - promising 
American Store executive - polished Romeo - 
our slender baton twirler and bandmaster - 
frequenter of the library and biology lab 
(why??) 



^-^y^^"^. 



RALPH RISSER MEASE 

"All-round" boy - math wiz - high scorer of 
college basketball league - speed demon on ball 
field - good-looking - blonde - "Mo" and 
"Dutch Roy" did go together. 



J. RICHARD McCURDY 

Phone boy - never seen much on weekends - 
must go back to the old stamping-grounds. 






JUNIOR 



GEORGE LUTHER MOORE 

A suave appearance belies a refreshing un- 

sophistication - self-confident - impressive 

violinist - sometimes swaggers - Romeo 

instincts. 



ROGER DEXTER MOREY 

Minister - proud "poppa" - week-end merchant 
- week-day book carrier - handball tyro - 
likable - conscientious - liberal-minded. 



WILLIAM PAUL MUELLER 

"Thin-haired" business man - political agita- 
tor - habitual pipe-smoker - Stokes' mimeo- 
graphed "stooge" - card player of no mean 
ability. 



Page 98 




CLASS 



PETER GEORGE OLENCHUK 
"Babe in arms" - pride of "Joisey City" - 
conscientious pre-med. - too conscientious 
(eh, Verna?) - Pete in a dress suit (Penguin!) 




RICHARD DEAN OWEN 

"Smaroothie" from the Haverford set - winters 
largely in South (Hall) - sailboat addict and 
skipper - wide-eyed "pretty" boy - infectious 
grin. 




MARIE PATRICIA PETERS 

Campus bow-belle - an emphatic lecturer - 
care-free curls and teeth like pearls - hidden 
interest in art school - future child physician. 





j Page 99 




JUNIOR 



Page 100 



EARL WAYNE REBER 

Official keeper of Tyrone Lab - future medical 
missionary - Africa beware! - advisor to the 
lovelorn and others - good worker - idealist - 
individualist. 



JOHN LEE REX 

Student of education and science - good sport - 
friend in time of need - excellent tobacco 
mixtures - neat dresser - dogged stick-to- 
itiveness. 



ELIZABETH MARY SATTAZAHN 

Ardent student - serious minded, but with 
frivolous moments - L R. C. devotee - delves 
into the records of man's progress - sincere 
and friendly. 





CLASS 



EDWARD CHARLES SCHILLO 

Three-letter man - Captain of 1941's football 
team - fine punter - easily aroused but es- 
sentially peace-loving - pantlier-like - "Baldy." 



LOIS JANE SEAVERS 

Delovely Douis - smartly groomed - Hershey 
hostess - couldn't be sweeter - exploring mind - 
her heart belongs in Jefferson. 



HELEN RAE SECHRIST 

Amusingly gullible - nonchalantly sleek and 
smart - capable pianist - allergic to felines and 
rodents - migrates homeward when the week 




Page 101 




JUNIOR 



RICHARD FRANKLIN SEIVERLING 

Hershey Junior College transfer - voice - 
Romeo de luxe - curly hair - warmly received 
by Philo - budding historic writer - marathon 
"sack" victim. 



RALPH STANTON SHAY 

Scholar - potential prof - varsity gridder - man 
of affairs - day student encyclopedia - free- 
lance Lochinvar - L. V. C.'s Ben Franklin - 
agitator of note - boyish smile and rosy cheeks. 



CARL RAYMOND SHERK 

Brilliant embryo physician - excellent student - 
"one-girl" man - lover of the dance - haber- 
dashery clerk - ex-soda-jerker - clever wit - 
terrorizer of tlie Frosh. 



Page 102 





»M f^B, 



CLASS 



BETTY LOUISE SHILLOTT 
Vivacious smile - "Victorian" giggle - varie- 
gated temperament - enviable ivory massager - 
inevitable actress - square-toed pumps and 
print dresses. 



IRMA JUNE SHOLLEY 

Sincerity, kindness, and understanding per- 
sonified - a promising pianist - to say nothing 
of her inherent teaching abilities - sweet, but 
not sticky - quiet but fun-loving. 



PAULINE ELIZABETH SMEE 
South Hall's petite blonde and glamour girl - 
mathematically minded - but scientifically 
interested - "a place for everything and 
everything in its place" - that's Polly's coiffure. 








J.wk'^^ 




JUNIOR 



GEORGE WASHINGTON SMITH 

"Flighty" - red hair - full of pep - Glenn 
Cunning (ham) for short - "hot corner" on 
baseball team - three-letter man. 



VIOLA ARLENE SNELL 
One of South Hall's personality gals - infectious 
giggle - "Red"-fever - self-Snellficient - liockey 
line and dancing - fine. 



DOROTHY JANE STABLEY 

Jauntily sporty - frankly friendly - sealed- 
lipped confidante - gives and takes - gamely 
comes through with a grin, a bruise or break. 



W-^ 



Page lO'i 



CLASS 



DONALD STAUFFER STALEY 

Better known as chap never down - manager 
of padded cell 311 - good football, basketball, 
and baseball man. 



ALFRED EDWARD STEVENS 
"Big boy with a big heart" - Prof. Stokes' 
future economist - can back up his opinions 
with his pugilistic abihty. 



SAMUEL HESS STONER 
L. V. C.'s Bill Tell - working toward pulpit 
via tray - a book-cracker - silent silences and 
quiet conversations - conscientious gentleman. 





Pagq 105 




JUNIOR 



JOHN FRANCIS SWOPE 
"Kid Swope" - agricultural product in the 
business ad department - tall, bashful and 
quiet - hard-playing A 11- American from Myers- 
town - handy man with a shotgun. 



VICTORIA TURCO 

Mr. Violin her first and true love - bitterly 
sweet - true friend - admirable standards - 
temperamentally an actress - Shillott-Turco 
giggle - flashing dark vivacity. 



CHARLES JAMES WALTER TYSON, JR. 
"Chuck" - one of the Paxtang Boys - radical 
on all subjects - gridiron statistician - ex- 
ponent of Roosevelt and the New Deal. 



Page 106 



CLASS 



ROBERT TOUNSLEY WEILER 

"Rudolph the Lover" - one of the few conserve 
athletes - an ace on the mound - fun-loving - 
strikingly blonde - sense of humor - punster - 
crooner 





ROBERT GEORGE WHISLER 

Ministerial student of fine ability - so-called 
bookworm - Hummelstown's one peaceful 
citizen - no bother to anyone- contented with 
his work. 



'\^W^ %^ 




RUTH IRENE WIX 

All the world loves a wit, a friend, a student, 
and a sport - the sum of these is not equal to 
the whole but should carry Ruth a long way in 
the do - re - mi field. 





Page 107 




JUNIOR 



CHRIS GEORGE WORNAS 
Pre-medical student - plugger (do or die spirit) 
- intramural basketball star - tennis court 
caretaker - dry cleaner - romanticist. 



THEODORE FREDERICK YOUSE 
Class A basketball guard - barrel-chested - 
ex-National Guardsman - black hole pyroma- 
niac - Alpha and Omega of agitation - interest- 



V 



RICHARD BOYER ZENTMEYER 

Pol. Sci. wiz - sandy-haired amateur aviator - 
transfer from Hershey Junior College - "Joe 
College" lad - likable, lean, lanky - card 
enthusiast. 




Page 108 




CLASS 



GEORGE CLINTON ZEIGLER 

Swarthy Romeo - humor under solemnity - 
slow and easy with sharp punctuations - York 
County drawl - chem. labber - campus stroller 
- Evelyn knows. 



FRANK STOEY ZIMMERMAN, JR. 

Future winner of Nobel prize in chemistry - 
fencing coach - CcU^d expert - ladies' man - 
"extra" extrovert - incessant babbler - "dor- 
mitory" day student. 





Page 109 




May 4, 1940 May Day cold dawn overcast 

sky Freshmen out early to decorate 8 a.m. scholar- 
ship exams prospective students of all kinds shy 

and bold, confident and shaky, talkative and quiet 

next year's crop of Frosh noon-hour confusion of 

students, prospe.tive and old grads last-minute 

preparations for the afternoon dash to Harrisburg for 

maid of honor's hat colder and cloudier stands 

begin to fill band members running around, tuning 

up, fastening music in the dorms excitement of 

dressing . 



Page 110 



Junior music students giving last-minute instructions 
stands full, crowd milling about Miss Hender- 
son cool and collected through it all 2 o'clock, the 

down-beat, and the May Fete is under way a fanfare 





and the King's herald resplendent in ice-blue on awhite 
horse announces King Arthur and his noble Knights 
of the Round Table. 

ExcaUbur the drawing of the sword before our 

eyes and prop boys carrying off the rock strains 

of Gounod's "Marionet" set the court jesters to frolick- 



%\it Court 

of 
Eing arthur 




M\ID OF HONOR 



%\it Queen . . . 

ing stately processional of Queen and Court, Knights and 

Court Ladies Queen Louise Saylor in rose-tinted white 

gown Maid of Honor Carmella Galoppi in lavender 

Ladies of the Court Barbara Bowman, Rachael Holdcraft, Lillian 
Leisey, Jeanne Schock, Bernice Witmer, Kathryn Zwally in 

blues, yellows, pinks Coronation ceremony the Pageant 

dance of the Maids and Housekeepers of the Court trim 

black and white uniforms, mirrors and feather dusters court 

fencers 

Stirring strains of "Wilham Tell Overture" as King's Lancers 

drill dance of the peasants colorful whirling figures 

gavotting on the green dance of the chefs and waiters 

Page il2 





. ... and her Court 



Elmira, the pig, stole the show jester catapulting from one side of court to the other 

Knights' drill chivalry on the march to the tune of "Semper FideUs" flower dance - - - 

photographers in the way of the dancers farewell dance of Court Ladies brocades, satins 

and taffetas rustUng in the wind winding the May Pole wind blowing and clouds hang- 
ing lower Percy Grainger's "Country Gardens" and the spectacular finale pigeons, 

pigeons wheeling, diving and fluttering over the dancers recessional Queen carried off 

photographers slowing things up another May Day is history. 




Page 113 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor-in-chief 
Robert Guinivan 



Sedion Editors 
Mabjorie Holly 
Phoebe Geyer 
David Shaner 
Ruth Heminway 
Jack Dobbs 

Photography Editors 
Joseph Carr 
George Zeigler 

Printing Editor 
Robert Mays 



Engraving Editor 
Robert Guinivan 

Literary Editors 
Phoebe Geyer 
Martha Davies 
Robert Mays 

Typists 
Mildred Cross 
Betty Gravell 

Secretary 

Floda Trout 



BUSINESS STAFF 



Business Manager 
Robert Dresel 

Donald Glenn 
Karl Sherk 
Ralph Shay 




Charlie, my boy, you merit our ineffable approbation for your unsurmounted 
emulation of the talents of the literary art. 



Page 116 




Yearbook Producers 



ANY yearbook publication demands cooperative 
-^^ and concerted work. We do not wish to tell you 
how much we did, when we did it, or how we did the 
work. More so than the above, our staff wishes to 
acknowledge the work done by the people connected 
with the publication. 

We acknowledge the work done for us by Kenneth 
Guthrie. If anyone pulled this annual out of a deep 
hole, it was Ken. Ken gave ideas, cut classes, worked 
nights, and delivered on time. Ken put out our "fire" 
and saved all. 

We thank Mr. "Bill" UUery for his work on our book. 
Coach gave us our Junior informals and a host of other 
pictures. Coach was always on time and ready to go. 
Coach put up a great fight in putting out our "fire." 

We also extend thanks to Professor Carmean for his 
May Day, tennis, baseball, and play pictures. 

Last, but not least, the cooperation and concerted 
efforts of the Quittie staff deserves recognition. All 
went well. 



Robert Dresel 

Business Manager 

Robert Guinivan 
Editor-in-Chief 




1942 QUITTAPAHILLA 



Page ii7 




Richard Was Caught on a Sneak -Date 
"Poor Richard" 



IN THE Junior Class play, "Poor Richard," we lived 
again in the romantic past of the eighteenth century. 
The intrigue of a corrupt foreign court and the stirring 
battles of the American Revolution were enacted against 
a background of minuets and powdered wigs. The ac- 
tion centered around the diplomacy of Benjamin 
Franklin in France. Here he fought a battle alone 
against the subtle diplomacy of the British ambassador 
and those in the court who feared him. Dr. Franklin 
has time for other activities, however, and gives help 
to an eloping couple. Everything is against the mar- 
riage of a young nobleman and a French actress but 
again the great statesman uses his diplomacy and 
brings happiness to them both. The play contains a 
fine plot and brilliant dialogue, and the love story is a 
refreshing supplement. 

A costume play was something new for the Junior 
class. The spectacle of elaborate costumes was very 
effective and the cast fully enjoyed their part in pro- 
viding it. 

There were handicaps, however. On the day of 
dress rehearsal several of the costumes had not yet 
arrived. Among the missing articles was a most im- 
portant white satin negligee. The actress who was to 
wear that costume cried quite temperamentally, "I 
won't go on without that negligee!" The immediate 
result was that Dr. Stine was recruited as a driver and 
the countess took a forty-mile ride to secure another 




Page US 




negligee! Later the original turned up in another bundle. 
One actor arrived at the zero hour and had to be fitted 
into long stockings, wig and ruffles while the string 
trio played an extra number. But these unexpected 
happenings only made "Poor Richard" a more inter- 
esting event. 

Ralph Shay made Benjamin FrankUn a very real 
person. He slipped from one phase of his character to 
another with great skill. One moment he was the 
shrewd diplomat who was capable of persuading a 
nation into war; the next he was a wise old man of the 
world who could handle a scheming countess; again he 
was a sympathetic stranger who would help a young 
couple to reach America. His scene with Lord Stor- 
mont (Jack Dobbs) will not be forgotten quickly. At 
the British ambassador's suggestion of bribery Franklin 
went into a rage that made stage history! 

French society was represented in all of its ranks 
from the pompous royalty of Louis XVI (Dave Gockley) 
to the coy maid (Louise Boger). Mary Louise Clark 
captured the haughty air of a lady of the nobiUty with 
ease and played her role effectively. Monsieur de 
Beaumarchais (Earl Boltz) added the touch of the 
sophisticate. He was the man of letters, romantic and 
gay, and as such he was welcomed in all circles. His 



acting showed a genuine sense of the dramatic. Celestine 
Meriancourt, of the Theatre Francais, (Martha Davies), and 
the Marquis de Sant Foy (Bob Dresel) were the young lovers 
in the midst of a cast of older people. Martha demonstrated 
both charm and ability in the difficult role of playing a part 
within a part. Bob Dresel was the handsome soldier and lover 
who did not hesitate to step out of his own class to marry a 
girl of the despised profession. The combination of Caroline 
Kissinger as the scheming French countess and Bob Weiler as 
her flirtatious cohort was very reaUstic. These two occupied a 
rather doubtful place in society where they lived by their 
wits alone. Earl Reber gave an impressive portrayal of the 
historically famous Comte de Vergenne. Phoebe Geyer 
reminded us again of what can be done with a small part in 
her excellent portrayal of the indignant landlady of the 
Toison d'Or. The success of "Poor Richard" was in large 
measure due to the efforts of Dr. Strublewho directed the play. 





.jeie>£«K«^ar.»>« 



-r"t<ff?si-— ^.■s>.». 



Boys' Band 



Lebanon Valley College Boys' Band practices on into the night wooden 

soldiers par excellence nary a slip in its intricate drills did you ever notice 

Caton, all wrapped up in his sousaphone? absolutely the best band for miles around 

"-Mac's" polished baton flinging something worth watching the "little sister" 

of the band an added attraction this season highly appreciated by the entire 

student body. 



Girls' Band 



Lebanon Valley College Girls' Band nattily uniformed, smart-stepping, stream- 
lined midget drum line only an occasional sour note but they believe 

practice makes perfect (even at eight a.m.) cheer "Annvillers" annually with their 

contribution to the Hallowe'en parade indispensable to the Spring Festival has 

perfected colorful and precise drills adds "oomph" to the Boys" Band at games. 





Glee Club 



One of the most outstanding organizations on campus ably directed by Prof. 

Rutledge goes on extended tour every year which usually results in an unexpected 

series of affaires (T amour once a year they have a very private showing of the un- 

censored tour films other yearly events are Forum concert Music Festival 

Baccalaureate Service theme song recently selected by unanimous approval 

"Hallelujah Chorus" 



Symphony Orchestra 



Lebanon Valley College Symphony Orchestra membership highly coveted by 

all conserv. students beautifully executes the heavier musical works a source 

of genuine enjoyment for all participating not to mention those on the listening end 

provides instrumental background for annual oratorio its flawless spring 

concert one of the supreme triumphs of the year Professor Rutledge well merits 

the acclaim it draws. 





"Batter Up" 

UNDER the tutelage of Coach Ullery, 
the Lebanon Valley diamond aspirants 
launched their 1940 baseball season in a mist 
of a Pennsylvania fog that ceased long enough 
to allow the lads to cavort about the diamond 
for nine contests of a scheduled fourteen. 
Coach Ullery, serving his first term as a Blue 
and White tutor, developed the boys to such 
an extent that they posted an average of .333, 
showing three wins in nine starts. 

Old Jupe Pluvius shed mighty tears to 
completely drown out the Dutchmen's first 
three contests, including an anticipated week- 
end journey through the wilds of Maryland. 

Finally, after having as little practice as 
possibly could be expected, a group of friendly 
mountaineers from Chestertown, Maryland, 
wearing the uniforms of Washington College, 
came to Annville to inaugurate the season. 
Without a president to initiate the ceremonies, 
the Marylanders lashed out with timely hitting 
and spectacular fielding to hand the Blue and 
White its first reverse, 8-4. Big George 
Katchmer was given the hurling burden, but 
he immediately reUnquished all claims after 
failing to survive the opening stanza. Bob 
Weiler then took charge to toss commendable 
ball. 




't 

^^H 







Page 122 



■?-*^v 




Five days later, after being put through 
hours of torturous rehearsal, the Dutchmen 
journeyed to CoUegeville into the lair of the 
Ursinus Bear with the hopes of returning with 
a nice big fur coat, but were fortunate in 
escaping with their own hides after the big 
black bear clawed them to the tune of 10-8. 
Hurling master Kuhn was entrusted with the 
task of taming the beast, but as his outfielders 
didn't want to play, Frankie ended up on the 
short end of the score. Bob Weiler offered 
relief in the eighth inning after Kuhn became 
bored. 

Labeled as a rehef hurler, \\'eiler surprised 
all by accepting the starting assignment on 
the mound against a powerful western Mary- 
land outfit. The result was disastrous. Coach 
UUery pulled a few more strands from his 
fast-fading hairline, the Dutchmen assumed a 



lifeless attitude on the field, while the mild 
mannered semi-Southerners pounded out a 
15-2 victory. "Cherry Tree" Katchmer re- 
lieved the ailing Weiler to squelch the riot. 
The game was even Hmited to seven frames. 

In a desperate effort to introduce a new 
column in the L. V. record books — a win 
column — Frank Kuhn tackled the Loyola 
team before a cheering handful of May Day 
fans. The results were gratifying as a re- 
sparked Dutchman nine played heads-up ball 
to garner a 6-5 triumph. With Kuhn hurhng 
masterful ball, and the infield pepping it up, 
the Blue and White couldn't be beat. 



Page 123 






Outhitting the Delaware Mudhens, 14-11, Lebanon 
Valley went down to defeat, 12-11. With everybody but 
Coach UUery and Kuhn taking turns on the mound, 
the Valleyites went to pieces in the clutch to practically 
donate the game to the visitors. Katchmer, Weiler 
and Walters all saw service on the hill but had to re- 
treat for fear of being knocked over by a line drive. 
Sporting a lead throughout practically the whole con- 
test, the Dutchmen were clowning their way to victory- 
At the coach's request the fun stopped and the game 
was lost. Sixteen free tickets to the initial bag were 
issued. 

The next day, Frank Kuhn toed the mound again in 
an effort to rope the Bucknell Bisons. Allowing only 
one hit until the eighth, Kuhn was protecting a precious 
1-0 lead. However, in that fatal eighth, the Bisons 
romped around the sacks four times on five hits to 
emerge the victor 4-1. The Valley garnered five hits 
on that wind-swept afternoon. 

Southpaw "Bucky" Walters paved the way to Leba- 
non Valley's second victory of the season, when he 



Page 724 



pitched masterful ball to take the fire out of the Drexel 
Dragons. The score was 12-4 with Freshman Walters 
doing the major portion of the slugging. First-base 
coach Steele was requested to either cease his jockeying 
at that sack or leave the field. It seemed that he had a 
lot in common with the keystone sacker, the coach's 
son, who fanned five times and committed a few mis- 
plays, all of which WilUe enjoyed immensely. 

Two days later, Frank Kuhn won his second 6-5 
contest of the year, when he scalped the Juniata In- 
dians in a battle that was abbreviated by precipitation. 
The Dutchmen kept on their toes to eke out a victory, 
and give Kuhn a .500 pitching average for the season. 

In the season's finale, Bucky Walters was kicked by a 
desperate mule from Muhlenberg. Having lost two 
extra inning contests to the Dutchmen in previous 
years, the AUentowners were in a fighting mood. When 
all was over, the Red and White had taken the game 
4-3 on a pinch circuit blow by a substitute, ^^'alte^s 
didn't quite make it when the lump was up and the 
jockeying tough. 





"Nets to (You) Riickct"i 



■ ,.,.,ni.us. iHil il s„.vl> .ir.niMHls .,,- 
,,.,,..1 IV.m. n„r shl.lnils. It r I I'-' 

ll.,l II,.' s|M.rl is "" 't^''"' "'•"■ ^'''^' 

Sli.imulKMlllirjul.lasI >.•;.-•. orirnl.n.rs 
I,., |,„„„| |,in.srir in ;. "slrNV- ;.niii.K>i'(i' 
,„,,l,.|i.'S, SlrvN «Msnninninl,cr..nctni,n. 
Wl.cn "Sl.'SN NM,son"li.MunMn'l iM'l.r;,!. 




o 



^-^.■MuUI lu- s.vn i.n.un.l ti.c I.M.n.s 
,,,„rls wal.'l.i..;;' a ."i'l.li 1..'Uv.mm. 1. V. 
,„„1 a visilinfi- lean,. \ iovvr.l l-un. ll..> 
,„„,,^_ ,„„. ,ni..l,| l.av tiucsscl il Nvas an 
„„,,l„nr .lass in ti.rk .•x.'iriscs, lor licails 
,^.,v n.-.vint: .'onslanllN rn.iu rlKl.l lo 
,„,., ,„„, ,,„,u M,ain. Hul. nnImm, n, U.o 
,,„„,1 ,.,u luu niuN.'.! Nunr i.ca.l ^u\\^ 
,,,, ,vsl and wal.'l,.'.! .L.s.'ly Danny 
S.'iv.Tlinfj; or Slew Siia|.in> or Sam ( .nmn> 
surprise and b.' surprised. Will. .'arl. 
surprise was a round ol" applans.'. vmIH 
••llirnlhcr" silence. 



The 1940 tennis schedul 


^ as re- 


leased by Athletic Director Frock 


is as follows: 




April 19 


Moravian . . . 


Away 


April 22 


Elizabethtown 


Home 


April 24 


F. and M. . . 


Away 


April 25 


Bucknell . . . 


Away 


April 27 


Albright . . . 


Away 


May 4 


Western Maryland Home 


May 6 


West Chester . 


Home 


May 9 


Drew University 


Home 


May 10 


Upsala ... 


Home 


May 14 


Muiilenberg . . 


Away 


May 18 


F. and M. . . 


Home 


May 24 


Bucknell . . . 


Home 


May 25 


Dickinson . . 


Away 





Page 128 



SENIORS 




Chaklks Beittel 




Jeanne Bliven 




Fred Bosnyak 




Richard I^ell 




Anna Bomberger 




Margaret Boyd 
Page 130 




Bernard Bentzix 




Maigaret Bordwell 




Robert Breen 



SENIORS 




Gladys Brown 




Theodore Ciamillo 




Joe Conrad 




Earl Caton 




Catherine Coleman 




Joan Cox 
Page 131 




Solomon Caulker 




Ralph Conley 




Edwin Creeger 



SENIORS 




Conrad Curry 




Lat ri:m: Dm 




MaURKK i^^RDMAN 




Samuel Derrick 




John Dressler 




Josephine Ernst 
Page 132 




Dorothea Donough 




Jane Ehrhart 




Lucille Esbenshade 



SENIORS 




Marlin Espenshade 




Max Flook 




Joseph Gittlen 




Joseph Fauber 




Martha Foster 




Henry Gottshall 
Page 133 




Harry Fehl 




WiLMER (ilMORK H 




Bernard Grabusky 



SENIORS 




Samuel Grimm 




Luke Hains 




Mary Homan 




George Grow 




Raymond Hess 




Audrey Immler 
Page 13^ 




Robert Hackman 




Ij OI^I IIOLLINGER 




Jeannette Kalbach 



SENIORS 




Nathan Kantor 




Lynn Kitzmiller 





Haven Kessel 




Arthur Kofroth 





Marjorie Kishbaugh 




Fillmore Kohler 



Martha Koontz 



Dorothea Kroll 
Page 135 




SENIORS 




Bradford Long 




Mabel Jane Miller 




Frances Prutzman 




William McKnight 




Robkrt Nichols 




Alexander Rakow 
Page 136 




Charles Miller 




Ferne Poet 




Robert Rapp 



SENIORS 




William Reed 




Mildred Rittle 





Marian Reiff 




Richard Rodes 




Betty Rutherford 



Edna Rutherford 
Page 137 




Robert Reiff 




Ellen Ruppersburger 




LOUELLA SCHINDEL 



SENIORS 




Irene Seiders 




Frank Shenk 




Harvey Snyder 




Fred Shadle 




Frederick Smee 




Mary Spangler 
Page 138 




Isabel Shatto 




Stauffer Smith 




David Simital 



SENIORS 




Paul Stouffer 




Jean Stric.khoislb 





Floda Trout 



TiiELMA Trupe 




Evelyn Ware 




Robert Wright 
Page 139 




Clinton Zimmerman 



LEADERS 



Outstanding W^ofuati Leader 
Floda Trout 




-#P ^ 







ff^^Pf^MJm 



Best-Looking Man 
Joseph Carr 





Page iW 



Outstanding Man Leader 
John Dressler 




Best-Looking Woman 
Joan Cox 




Best Man Athlete 
Edward Schillo 




Best-Dressed Woman 

LOUELLA SCHINDEL 



Page Ihl 



LEADERS 



Best Woman Athlete 
Phoebe Geyer 




Best-Dressed Man 
Maurice Erdman 




LEADERS 



Flute 



Catherine Coleman 




Baritone 

Robert Hackman 





Voice 



Earl Caton 




j 1 Tii .-.„ i3immmi 
Violin 

Victoria Turco 



Page 1^2 



MlHHjjjk 



LEADERS 



""9"^ 




Cornet 

Herbert Curry 




Cello 



Jessie Robertson 



Organ 

Virginia Goodman 




String Base and Cornet 
Paul Fisher 



Page U3 




Ha ^it Collegienne 

'T'HIS year, which seems to be one of tradition breaking, has brought an innovation to La Vie 
witii the selection of a woman editor. Although this brought about some changes in the manage- 
ment of the paper, many tiiink that it lias been a benefit rather than otherwise. The paper has 
continued to appear on Thursday with the iiighlights of the news and the social events of the 
campus. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Jane Y. Ehrhart Editor 

Ralph Shay Associate Editor 

Martha Davies Neivs Editor 

Louella M. Schindel Features Editor 

Alex Rakow Sports Editor 

John Dressler Business Manager 



NEWS STAFF 

Margaret Cox Robert Ness 

Robert Guinivan Howard Paine 

Ruth Heminway Frances Prutzman 

Louise Keller David Shaner 

Martha Jane Koontz Genevieve Stansfield 
Robert Mays 

FEATURES STAFF 

Margaret Bordwell Ferne Poet 

Robert Nichols Floda Trout 

SPORTS STAFF 

Betty Anne Rutherford 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Richard Bell Guy Dobbs 

Donald Glen William Reed 



Page L'lU 




<tr 



Page li5 




Phi Alpha Epsilon 



Although we have here on campus no 
chapter of the national honor society, Plii 
Beta Kappa, we do have a society tliat answers 
tlie same purpose. This society was formed in 
tlie spring of 1935 for those students who have 
maintained an average of eighty-eight per cent 
or better in the first three and one half years. 
The purpose of tlie society is to promote a more 
healthy interest in the scholastic side of college life. 
Those elected this year are: 



Charles R. Beittel 
Margaret June Bordwell 
Dorothea R. Donough 
Jane Y. Ehrhart 
Marlin a. Espenshade 
Raymond C. Hess 
Eloise Mae Hollinger 
Martha Jane Koontz 



Mabel Jane Miller 
E. Ferne Poet 
Francis E. Prutzman 
Marian L. Reiff 
Robert H. Reiff 
Edna C. Rutherford 
Louella M. Schindel 
Floda E. Trout 




Page Ui6 




"W7ITHIN the last two years the growing 
interest in archery has given it a definite 
place among other sports on the campus. Com- 
plete equipment has been provided for both men 
and women and provision made for instructing 
those interested in learning to shoot. Those who 
made archery their major sport organized the 
Archery Club, and by setting specific entrance 
requirements limited its membership to only 
those actively interested. 

The program of the Club includes practice 
matches, novelty shoots, competitive matches 
with the Club, and tournaments with outside 
groups. The archery team is composed of those 
members whose scores in the competitive matches 
are highest. A system of awards provides in- 
centive for members to better their scores. 

At present archery on the campus is limited to 
spring and fall, but it is hoped that an indoor 
range will be possible, providing for winter shoot- 
ing as well. 

The officers of the club are: 

President: Lucile Esbenshade 
Secretary-Treasurer: Samuel Stoner 



Archery 




f*^' 
1 «•«»' 



#i 




Page US 




Gi 



antout 



Floda Trout 



Marjorie Kishpaugh 



Page U9 




Janet Schopf 





Feme Poet 



^eautu 



Page 150 




Page 151 



EQautu 



Margaret Boyd 





Pauline Smee 



qi 



antout 



Page 152 



Kodaks, Movie Cameras and Film 

Portrait and Commercial Photography 

heather Goods and Luggage 

Stationery, Gifts 

• 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Shenk & Tittle 

' 'Everything for Sport" 



313 Market Street 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 

Phone: 4-3046 



Where Our Friends and Familiar Faces Will 
Never Be Forgotten 

THE 

Pennway Restaurant 

Affiliated with the Pennway Bakeries 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

H. E. MILLARD 

HIGH CALCIUM LIME AND LIMESTONE PRODUCTS 
Ask Your Dealer for Millard's Agriculture and Mason's hime 

Annville, Penna. 



Page 153 




PORTRAITS 

Commercial Photography 

Copying 

Photofinishing 



Prices begin at $8.00 per dozen 



Kenneth L. Guthrie 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 

HILL & DALE SHOES 
For College Girls 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 

"For the Man Who Cares" 



34 N. Eighth Street 



LEBANON, PA. 



ESTABLISHED 1882 



Cottiers iprinting £o. 



LEBANON, PA. 



Printing . Binding . Offset 

PUBLICATIONS • SCHOOL ANNUALS 
General Commercial Printing 



JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

''The Flower Shop'' 

Corsages Our Specialty 
Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flowers Telegraphed 

Anywhere, Anytime 

Phone: Lebanon 592 



"Davis^ Tharmacy 

Photo Supplies Sodas 
Cosmetics 

Prescriptions Compounded 



103 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Page i5U 



Covers for the 

1942 Quittapahilla 

Manufactured by 

National Publishing Company 

239-45 South American Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Manufacturers of 

De Luxe Yearbook Covers and 

Loose-leaf Devices 



Page 155 



LIKE TO DANCE? 



LIKE TO GOLF? 



HERSHEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Affords opportunity for both diversions 

In May and June the Hershey Park Ballroom presents orchestras of 
Nation-wide fame on Saturday nights. In July and August and until Labor 
Day on Wednesday and Saturday nights. Also on holidays. 

From April to mid-November the Hershey Park Golf Course is open to the 
public. It's one of the finest and sportiest i8-hole courses in Pennsylvania. 

$1 greens fee weekdays; $1.50 on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. 



This Space Has Been Bought By 



FINK'S BAKERY 



ANNVILLE - - PENNSYLVANIA 



Page 156 



You cannot patent it or copyright it you cannot install 

it like a piece of machinery. 

You cannot accurately measure it or the lack of it. 

Yet it is your most important consideration when you choose your Yearbook 
Photographer. 

It is 

"KNOWING HOW" 

Experience 

is the one thing that will meet the unusual emergency with the comfort- 
ing statement — "We know just what to do — we've been through this before." 

Our complete organization offers you this background of experience in crea- 
tive photography and consultation on all problems relating to Yearbook 
Photography. 

It costs nothing to talk it over with us. 

ZAMSKY STUDIOS 

1007-09-11 Market Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



READING FOUNDRY 

and 

SUPPLY CO. 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Compliments of 

EDWARDS RESTAURANT 

Good food 



Excellent Fountain Service 



"The Live Store" 



"Always Reliable" 



DoutrichS 



DEPENDABLE 

GUARANTEED 



Clothes 



Manhattan and Arrow Shirts 
Stetson Hats 
We replace anything that is not entirely satisfactory 

HARRISBURG, PENNA. 



Page 157 




MODERN 

HEALTH 

SHOES 



KREIDER SPORTS 



SHOES 



"300" Juveniles 



J\lanujactured by 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



PHONE: 
Annville7-3511 
Hershey 10611 



Vs^f 



la^ 



Sr 



^%0 



afn> 



()nC' 



CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 



De Luxe Service 



C. B. GOLLAM & SONS 

Atatiu/aciurers 0/ 

Go/lam's "SUPREME" Ice Cream 

The Cream of Matchless Merit 

Phone : 2 1 6th and Maple Streets 

LEBANON, PA. 



When In Harrisburg Stop At 

KIRKPATRICK'S 

way Service Stations 



High 



FOR 
Complete Service on Your Car 

SIX CONVENIENTLY LOCATED STATIONS 

2d and Verbeke Sts. 18th and Derry Sts. 

6th and Curtin Sts. Cameron and Paxton Sts. 

Chestnut and 4th Sts. 17th and Paxton Sts. 



CHURCH CENTER 
PRESS 

Supplies jor all branches oj 
religious work 

Printing : : Publishing 
MYERSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 



D. L. SAYLOR and SONS 



Contractors and Builders • Coal and Lumber 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Page 158 



Matrons 



Hon. Wm. N. McFaui, Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. H. M. Imboden New York City 

Dr. R. E. Morgan Annville, Pa. 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rev. W. a. Wilt Annville, Pa. 

Rev. Paul E. V. Shannon York, Pa. 

Rev. J. Paul Gruver Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Rev. 0. T. Ehrhart Lancaster, Pa. 

Rev. F. Berry Plummer Hagerstown, Md. 

Rev. H. E. Miller Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev. L S. Ernst Carlisle, Pa. 

Rev. Millard J. Miller Dayton, Ohio 

Mr. Alfred K. Mills Annville, Pa. 

Mr. Harold T. Lutz Baltimore, Md. 

Mr. Maurice R. Metzger Middletown, Pa. 

Mr. E. W. Coble Lancaster, Pa. 

Mr. Albert Watson Carlisle, Pa. 

Mr. R. G. Mowrey Quincy, Pa. 

Prof. H. H. Baish Harrisburg, Pa. 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush Minersville, Pa. 

Hot Dog Frank Annville, Pa. 

RuFUS S. Kettering, A&P Store Annville, Pa. 



Page 159 



A MESSAGE 

To the 1943 
Editor of 

QUITTAPAHILLA 




Our representative will he delighted 
to discuss the 1942 edition of your 
Annual with you and your adviser. 
An interview will not obligate you in 
any way. If you are interested, we 
shall be happy to have you visit us 
here at the Mount Pleasant Press so 
that you can see how we wor}{ and 
what we do. Write us or telephone 
us for an appointment. 



"Y^OUR Annual reflects something of 
the spirit of your class. It serves to 
record another chapter of the history and 
tradition of your school- As the years pass, 
it will mean more to you because every 
time you turn the pages of your Yearbook 
you will conjure up memories of pleasant 
days. You will think of the ideals and the 
standards which were the very founda' 
tion of your Alma Mater. 

For more than sixty years -we have 
been engaged in the great art of printing. 
We are guided in our work by high stand' 
ards and high ideals. We are able to place 
at your service a staff of experienced dc 
signers, capable craftsmen and well in' 
formed representatives who are always 
eager to serve you. 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

Mount i^lcasant ^rcsB 
HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

Telephone: 623.5 



Page 160